Obtaining Let’s Encrypt HTTPS SSL Certificate on Windows

Friday, May 10th, 2019

Obtaining Let's Encrypt HTTPS SSL Certificate on Windows

Install the .NET Framework version 4.7.2, and then:

Download ACME Windows Client – WACS

To obtain a certificate, run the WACS.exe with the following arguments:

wacs.exe --target manual --host {DOMAIN_NAME} --webroot {PATH_TO_DOMAIN_ROOT_LIKE_C:\zpanel\panel} --emailaddress {EMAIL_ADDR} --accepttos --validation filesystem --store pemfiles --pemfilespath C:\certs

 

Installing the Newest Version of Python 2.7.x on Older Versions of Ubuntu (like 14.04)

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

Installing the Newest Version of Python 2.7.x on Older Ubuntu Systems

If you need to upgrade to the newest version of Python 2.7.x, and you're running an older distribution (like Ubuntu 14.04), use the following commands to get the latest version (works on Ubuntu 17.04 and older – tested on Ubuntu 14.04):

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:jonathonf/python-2.7
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install python2.7

Then, you'll need to cleanup a few leftover system packages manually before installing the newest version of python-pip.  If you don't do this, you'll run into problems installing some new packages using pip.

sudo rm /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/chardet*.egg-info
sudo rm -r /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/chardet
sudo rm /usr/lib/python2.7/lib-dynload/_hashlib.x86_64-linux-gnu.so
sudo rm /usr/lib/python2.7/lib-dynload/_hashlib.i386-linux-gnu.so

Now, you can download and install the newest version of python-pip:

curl https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py -o get-pip.py
sudo python get-pip.py

Getting Let's Encrypt Certbot to Work:

First, you'll need to install a few packages that Certbot (the Let's Encrypt client) uses:

sudo pip install requests
sudo pip install hmac

Now, you'll need to delete the EFF directory from the /opt directory to avoid old configuration issues that were used for your older version of python.  Once you cleanup this directory, you'll run certbot again so it can reconfigure itself. 

sudo rm -r /opt/eff.org/
sudo certbot

You're done.

Full list of commands (for quickly doing all of the above):

sudo -i
add-apt-repository ppa:jonathonf/python-2.7
apt-get update
apt-get install python2.7
rm /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/chardet*.egg-info
rm -r /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/chardet
rm /usr/lib/python2.7/lib-dynload/_hashlib.x86_64-linux-gnu.so
rm /usr/lib/python2.7/lib-dynload/_hashlib.i386-linux-gnu.so
mkdir -p /root/Downloads
cd /root/Downloads
curl https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py -o get-pip.py
python get-pip.py
pip install requests
pip install hmac
rm -r /opt/eff.org/
certbot

Configuring Let’s Encrypt Certbot on CentOS 7 with lighttpd

Saturday, April 27th, 2019

Configuring Let's Encrypt Certbot on CentOS 7 with lighttpd

Installing Certbot

First, install certbot by using the below commands:

sudo yum -y install epel-release
sudo yum install certbot

certbot is python based program that allows you to request SSL certificates for your domains. 

Request a Certificate

Use the below command to request a certificate (adjust paths and replace the test.com domain as necessary):

sudo certbot certonly --webroot -w /var/www/vhosts/test/httpdocs -d test.com

A certificate has now been stored in /etc/letsencrypt/live.  Create a combined certificate format by using the below command (replacing test.com with your real domain):

/bin/cat /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/cert.pem /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/privkey.pem > /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/custom.pem && /bin/chmod 777 /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/custom.pem && /sbin/service lighttpd restart

Certificate Renewal Cronjobs

You may want to create a cronjob to renew the certificate and a cronjob for regenerating the combined format certificate since the underlying certificate file can change (such as when it's renewed):

sudo crontab -e

Insert the below cronjobs:

0 1 * * 1 /usr/bin/certbot renew --quiet
5 1 * * 1 /bin/cat /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/cert.pem /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/privkey.pem > /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/custom.pem && /bin/chmod 777 /etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/custom.pem && /sbin/service lighttpd restart

Save your crontab configuration. 

Setting Up Lighttpd to Use SSL Certificate

Edit your default-enabled lighttpd configuration file in /etc/lighttpd/vhosts.d to look similar to the following (replacing test.com with your real domain and adjusting various file paths)

$HTTP["host"] == "test.com" {
  var.server_name = "test.com"
  server.name = server_name  server.document-root = vhosts_dir + "/test/httpdocs"
  #accesslog.filename          = vhosts_dir + "/test/log" + "/access.log"
}
$SERVER["socket"] == ":80" {
  server.document-root = vhosts_dir + "/test/httpdocs"
}
$SERVER["socket"] == ":443" {
    ssl.engine           = "enable"
    ssl.pemfile          = "/etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/custom.pem"
    server.document-root = vhosts_dir + "/test/httpdocs"
    ssl.ca-file = "/etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/chain.pem" # Root CA
    server.name = "test.com" # Domain Name OR Virtual Host Name
}

Here's how you can set a different document root for specific https (port 443) virtual hosts:

$SERVER["socket"] == ":443" {
    ssl.engine           = "enable"
    ssl.pemfile          = "/etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/custom.pem"
    server.document-root = vhosts_dir + "/test/httpdocs/"
    ssl.ca-file = "/etc/letsencrypt/live/test.com/chain.pem" # Root CA
    server.name = "test.com" # Domain Name OR Virtual Host Name
    
    $HTTP["host"] =~ "(^|www\.)somethingelse.test.com" {
        server.document-root = vhosts_dir + "/test/httpdocs/subdir"
    }
}

Save and restart the lighttpd service.

sudo service lighttpd restart

Congrats, SSL is now available on your domain, and your Let's Encrypt certificate has been configured and will be renewed automatically by your cronjob.