Allow Anonymous Read Only FTP via VSFTPD

Anonymous VSFTPD Setup (Read Only)

Configuration:

In order to enable anonymous FTP connections to a particular directory while still supporting authentication for virtual users for their files via PAM isn't that difficult.  Install VSFTPD if you haven't done so already by running the following command:

sudo apt-get install vsftpd

Create a backup of your existing VSFTPD confiugration file (this guide assumes you have already installed vsftpd):

sudo cp /etc/vsftpd.conf /etc/vsftpd.conf.bak

Next, let's edit the file:

sudo nano /etc/vsftpd.conf

Add the following lines to your configuration file:

anonymous_enable=YES
anon_root={INSERT_PATH_TO_ANONYMOUS_DIRECTORY}
anon_mkdir_write_enable=NO
anon_upload_enable=NO

Adding these lines enables anonymous FTP to the specified directory where files can be read and downloaded only.  Anonymous users cannot write, delete, change, or modify files because of the anon_mkdir_write_enable=NO and the anon_upload_enable=NO configuration lines.  For your changes to take effect, restart vsftpd.

sudo service vsftpd restart

You're done!

Geany PHP Beautifier

PHP Beautifier Support for Geany

Geany is by far one of the best text editors I have come across that works on both Windows and Linux.  It is also one of the most aesthetically pleasing editors to look at right out of the box.  I do a lot of PHP scripting, and as such, it is nice to have a "beautifier" script that will automatically format my code for me so that it looks nice.  Geany can also call the php executable and check your script syntax. You can achieve both of these features by installing both PHP for Windows and the PHP Beautifier PEAR addon.   

Install PHP for Windows:

If you code your PHP scripts in Windows, you'll want to use syntax checking and the PHP_Beautifier script.  To do so, you must install the PHP5 Windows package, which includes the main PHP binaries.

To get the files, download the latest version of PHP 5.3.

Extract the contents of the archive to "C:\php5"

Go into C:\php5 and rename "php.ini-development" to "php.ini".

PHP BEAUTIFIER WILL NOT WORK ON ANY NEW VERSION OF PHP FROM 5.4.X and UP!

Install PEAR for Windows:

PHP_Beautifier relies on PEAR functionality.  To install pear, save this file using a browser and place it in the "C:\php5" directory.  

Start command prompt, change directory into "C:\php5", and run the phar script:

C:\
cd C:\php5
php go-pear.phar

Install everything and keep default options.

Install PHP_Beautifier:

Now, install PHP Beautifier by running the following commands:

pear install PHP_Beautifier

Integration in Geany:

For PHP Syntax Checking:

In Geany, click on "Edit" in the menu bar and choose "Preferences".

In the "General" and "Startup" tabs, under the "Paths" section, paste "C:\php5" (without the quotes) into the "Extra plugin path:" field.

For PHP Beautifier:

Start the Geany text editor program.  Open a PHP script file.

Select the code you want to format, right click on the selected text, and choose "Format" –> "Send Selection to" –> "Set Custom Commands".

For command, use the following:

php C:\\php5\\php_beautifier -s4 -l "ArrayNested() NewLines(before=T_COMMENT:for:switch:foreach:T_CLASS:function:T_CLOSE_TAG,after=T_ENDIF:T_CLOSE_TAG:T_OPEN_TAG:T_ENDSWITCH:T_ENDWHILE:T_ENDFOR:T_ENDFOREACH)"

For "Label", use "PHP Beautifier"

Hit OK.

Now, select the code you want to format, right click on the selected text, and choose "Format" –> "Send Selection to" –> and pick "PHP Beautifier".  The code should now be formatted using the options specified in the command line arguments above.

For more filter options and commandline parameters, please read this PHP_Beautifier document.

 

Multiple Comment Forms on WordPress Page – Using WYSIWYG Editor NicEdit

WYSIWYG WordPress Comments

I tried and tried to get the CKEditor plugin for WordPress to initalize multiple comment textareas for a custom post type I had created using the pods WordPress plugin.  No matter how hard I tried, I failed.  Only the first instance would get initialized.  I dug through the code and found where the instance was created, but even with the code in front of my eyes, I could not figure out how to adapt the messy PHP / Javascript mesh to do what I wanted.

Eventually, I came accross a great guide explaining how to use NicEdit, a simple WYSIWYG editor that can be used easily to replace the boring WordPress comment box with something more friendly for end users leaving comments.

Following this guide, I downloaded and uploaded the NicEdit files to a folder named "scripts" in my theme's directory (please adjust the path in the functions below if you want to use another directory or place the files elsewhere).  I would recommend downloading the non-compressed version, as the code is easier to read and making changes is a lot easier.  I inserted the following function into my WordPress theme's functions.php file:

function add_nicEdit() {
    if ( !is_admin() ) {
        // register scripts
        wp_register_script('nicEdit', get_stylesheet_directory_uri() . '/scripts/nicEdit.js', array(), false, true);
 
        // enqueue scripts
        wp_enqueue_script('nicEdit');
    }
}
 
add_action('wp_enqueue_scripts', 'add_nicEdit');

Then, I created a new function that I added to NicEdit.js file.  After this code:

allTextAreas : function(nicOptions) {
        var textareas = document.getElementsByTagName("textarea");
        for(var i=0;i<textareas.length;i++) {
            nicEditors.editors.push(new nicEditor(nicOptions).panelInstance(textareas[i]));
        }
        return nicEditors.editors;
    },

I added a function called allCommentTextAreas:

allCommentTextAreas : function(nicOptions) {
        var textareas = document.getElementsByTagName("textarea");
        for(var i=0;i<textareas.length;i++) {
      if(textareas[i].className == "comment_editor"){
               nicEditors.editors.push(new nicEditor(nicOptions).panelInstance(textareas[i]));
      }
        }
        return nicEditors.editors;
    },

The way this function works is that it will replace all textareas that have a class of "comment_editor" only.

Next, in my theme's footer.php file after the <?php wp_footer(); ?> line, I added the following:

<script type="text/javascript">
           // We need to initialize the WYSIWIG editor for the comments field                   bkLib.onDomLoaded(function() { nicEditors.allCommentTextAreas({
                   iconsPath : '<?php bloginfo( 'stylesheet_directory' ) ?>/scripts/nicEditorIcons.gif', buttonList : ['bold','italic','strikethrough','link','unlink','removeformat']})
                   });
        </script>

In your pods page template, load comments like this:

$args["comment_notes_after"] = "";
$args["comment_field"] = '<p class="comment-form-comment"><label for="comment">' . _x( 'Comment', 'noun' ) .          
'</label><textarea id="comment" class="comment_editor" name="comment" cols="45" rows="8" aria-required="true">' .          
'</textarea></p>';
comment_form( $args, $post_id ); 

Your comments form will now look a lot better, specifically, they will look like this:

nic edit

Turn on IPv4 Easy Bash Way

Turn on IPv4 Forwarding by running this script:

cd ~/Downloads
wget -N "http://dinofly.com/files/linux/ipv4_forward.tar.gz"
tar -zxvf ipv4_forward.tar.gz
sudo bash forwarding.sh

It should work on all versions of Linux but has been tested and works perfectly on Ubuntu.

Disable BIND9 Recursive DNS Queries to Prevent UDP DDOS Flood Attacks

Turn Off BIND9 Recursion

By default, BIND9 is configured to allow recursive DNS queries.  This allows others to use your DNS server to query other domains on your server's behalf.  Unfortunately, recursive DNS queries can be used to amplify a UDP flood DDOS attack.  As such, for a shared web hosting environment, it is best to disable recursive DNS queries.  You can disable BIND9 recursion easily by running the following script:

cd ~/Downloads
wget -N "http://dinofly.com/files/linux/disable_bind9_recursion.tar.gz"
tar -zxvf disable_bind9_recursion.tar.gz
sudo bash disable_bind9_recursion.sh

It should work on all versions of Linux but has been tested and works perfectly on Ubuntu.  You may need to change the path used for the BIND config file. 

MySQL Dump Insert Statements Only

Using mysqldump to Create SQL Backups with Only Insert Statements and Ignore Existing Records

mysqldump -u USER -p PASSWORD --skip-triggers --compact --no-create-info --insert-ignore DBNAME

 

Debian & Ubuntu :: Suppress Installation Package Prompts Completely or Preconfigure Prompt Answers

Suppress Installation Package Prompts Completely or Preconfigure Installation Question Answers

Automating the installation of software via bash scripting on Linux can be difficult.  However, in debian and its related distributions such as Ubuntu, you can simplify the installation of packages by using a few tools.  One of these tools is called debconf-utils.  If installation packages such as MySQL or PHPMyAdmin ask configuration questions, you can provide a default set of answers without being prompted.  This is excellent for testing scripts or automating installation for users who may not know how to appropriately answer these questions.

Basically, with debconf-utils you can pre-answer these questions so that no prompts show up!

To install, run this command:

sudo apt-get install debconf-utils

To get a list of questions an installer might ask, first install the package on a test machine where you're writing the script normally.  For example, let's install phpmyadmin:

sudo apt-get install phpmyadmin

Now, to retrieve a set of questions phpmyadmin may ask, you can run this command:

sudo debconf-get-selections | grep phpmyadmin

In your bash script, you can now pre-answer certain questions by including your preconfigured answer commands before installing the package.  For example, when phpmyadmin installs, it asks for the MySQL root user password.  You can skip this prompt and define what the MySQL root password should be by using this command in your script:

echo 'phpmyadmin phpmyadmin/mysql/admin-pass password 1234' | debconf-set-selections

password defines the type and 1234 sets the password to 1234.
You can also suppress questions entirely by using the following command in front of your install command:

DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive sudo apt-get install phpmyadmin

Default configuration will be used during the installation of the phpmyadmin package, which means it may not work after being installed because some configuration options should be answered.  So, use both combinations for various packages to fit your needs!

Using JQuery Color Picker and Cookie Plugins to Change Element Background Colors Dynamically Based on User Preference

Changing Website Element Colors Dynamically Based on User Preferences

Wouldn't it be cool to dynamically style a website or webpage based on a user's favorite color?  Thanks to several JQuery plugins, it is now possible to do so!  The JQuery Color Picker plugin allows users to select a color based on a color pallete / color wheel similar to those found within photo editing software such as Adobe Photoshop or Corel PaintShop Pro.  The JQuery Color Plugin can darken, lighten, add, multiply, subtract, find color hues, change rgb values, and manipulate colors in all sorts of ways you probably never imagined possible.  The final piece to dynamically styling a page based on a user selected color is to save the picked color's value in a cookie using the JQuery-Cookie Plugin.  When any page loads, you will need to use the document.ready JQuery function to read the cookie and restyle elements as necessary.  If a cookie is not set, the default color can also be specified here. 

Here's a screenshot of the JQuery Color Picker in action:

To load / use the color picker, place this function within the document.ready function:

// Color Picker Loader
    $('#colorpicker').ColorPicker({
    
       color: defaultColor,
         onShow: function (colpkr) {
              $(colpkr).fadeIn(500);
              return false;
         },
         onHide: function (colpkr) {
              $(colpkr).fadeOut(500);
              return false;
         },
         onChange: function (hsb, hex, rgb) {
          var origColor = '#' + hex;
       
          // Set the main div background colors to what was selected in the color picker
              $('#colorpicker').css('backgroundColor', origColor);
          $('#origColor').css('backgroundColor', origColor);
          
          // Set the cookie
          $.cookie("color", '#' + hex, { path: '/' });
          
          // Set the dark and light colors (multi-iterations)
          darkColor = $.xcolor.darken('#' + hex).getHex();
          for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
            darkColor = $.xcolor.darken(darkColor).getHex();
          }
            
          lightColor = $.xcolor.lighten('#' + hex).getHex();
          for (var i = 0; i < iterations; i++) {
            lightColor = $.xcolor.lighten(lightColor).getHex();
          }
          
          
          // Set the light and dark divs
          $('#darkColor').css('backgroundColor', darkColor);
          $('#lightColor').css('backgroundColor', lightColor);
          
          // Change class attributes
          $('.light').css('backgroundColor', lightColor);
          $('.dark').css('backgroundColor', darkColor);
          $('.pad').css('backgroundColor', origColor);
          
          // Set the border
          $('#colorpicker').css('border-color', darkColor);
          
          
         }
    }); 

Assign a DIV element the ID of "colorpicker" in your HTML file to activate the color picker.    Don't change the "onShow" or "onHide" JQuery sub-functions of the ColorPicker.  When a user chooses a color from the color picker, the color picker "onChange" function is called.  This is where you need to define what should be done with the color the user has picked.  In my example, I call the $.xcolor.lighten and $.xcolor.darken Color Plugin functions to generate a lighter and darker color.  I use then use the color selected, a lighter variant of that color, and a darker variant of that color to style elements appropriately to keep text readable while offering a new color scheme.  As you can see from the code above, I mainly change the css attributes of certain classes, which the elements have been assigned.  What is changed is the backgroundColor and border-color of certain classes based on the three colors that were generated.

To see what other cool things you can do with all of these plugins, check out the links in the first paragraph.  Click here to see a live demonstration of all three plugins in action and download the source for how it all works based on the example discussed above.  The only Javascript file that needs to be changed to experiment with this sample is the "main.js" file within the "js" folder.

I hope this guide helps.  The plugin websites did not provide all of the code needed for a working sample, but luckily, I did the combination work for you.  Go ahead and use my source for anything!  Please comment if you have questions.

How to Make MATE Look Like Windows XP using the Luna Theme

Make MATE or GNOME2 Look Like Windows XP Using the Luna Theme

If you want your Linux installation to look like the original theme used in Windows XP, you can do that! This guide will walk you through the process of easily making any MATE or GNOME2 Desktop Environment look like the Windows XP GUI. The Luna Theme can be downloaded here and installed using our simple installation script. If you already have MATE installed or are already running GNOME2, skip to the Luna Theme install instructions.

Install MATE on Ubuntu:

Run the below commands for your matching Ubuntu version in a terminal to install MATE.  To find out which version of Ubuntu you're running, use this command:

lsb_release -a

For Ubuntu 12.04:

sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://packages.mate-desktop.org/repo/ubuntu precise main"
sudo apt-get update 
sudo apt-get --yes --quiet --allow-unauthenticated install mate-archive-keyring 
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y mate-desktop-environment

For Ubuntu 14.04:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ubuntu-mate-dev/ppa
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ubuntu-mate-dev/trusty-mate
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo apt-get install -y mate-desktop-environment-extras

For Ubuntu 16.04:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-mate-dev/xenial-mate
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade
sudo apt-get install -y mate-desktop-environment

For Other Distributions (Distros):

http://wiki.mate-desktop.org/download

Installing the Luna Theme:

Our version of the Luna theme has been converted and ported over to GTK3, so it should work with all newer flavors of Linux running MATE while still working on older Linux installs running GNOME2.To install the Luna Theme which will make Linux look like Windows XP, run the following commands. The theme files will be downloaded and saved in your Downloads directory.

cd ~/Downloads
wget -O linux_xp_luna_theme_install.tar.gz http://dinofly.com/files/linux_xp_luna_theme_install.tar.gz
mkdir Luna
tar -zxvf linux_xp_luna_theme_install.tar.gz -C Luna
cd Luna
sudo rm -rf /usr/share/themes/Luna
rm -rf ~/.themes/Luna
sudo bash install.sh

Next, Right Click on the Desktop, and choose "Change Desktop Background".  Click on the "Themes" tab.  Select "Luna".  Click on the "Background" tab.  If you want the default XP wallpaper set as your background, click on the "Add" button.   Select your "Pictures" folder.  Select "luna_background.jpg".  Click "Open".  Click on "Close" to change it. 

Now, MATE or GNOME2 looks like XP!  Enjoy!  This theme was copied from Ylmf OS 3.0.

The Monsanto Protection Act – “Farmer Assurance Provision, Section 735” – Promotes the Growth and Engineering of GMO Foods and Seeds Without Any Judicial Oversight or Regulation

The Monsanto Protection Act & What It Means For YOU

"Free from Any Judicial Litigation" – WAIT WHAT?!?!?!

The “Farmer Assurance Provision, Section 735”, known as the Monsanto Protection Act, is a provision that was slipped into the "Continuing Resolution" spending bill.  This spending bill is designed to prevent the government shutdown and sequester.  The Continuing Resolution bill, including the Farmer Assurance Provision, passed the house and was signed by President Obama on March 29, 2013.  A sub-committee slipped the provision into the bill anonymously.  However, news has spread that Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt (R) drafted the provision in direct conjunction with Monsanto.  His reasoning for supporting such a provision: "it is only a one-year protection.”

So, What Does this Do?

In short, the Farmer Assurance Provision, Section 735 "allows agribusiness giant Monsanto to promote and plant genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and genetically engineered (GE) seeds, free from any judicial litigation that might decide the crops are unsafe".

It stipulates that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) “ignore any court ruling that would otherwise halt the planting of new genetically-engineered crops.”  Typically, the USDA approves GMO products and seeds as long as they pass certain filing regulations and conditions.  Unfortunately, the USDA does not conduct thorough reviews or tests of the many submitted food products it receives.  To speed up the process, the USDA typically approves products without performing tests that study long term effects.

Tests of these controversial products are usually performed much later by independent groups.  Some are sponsored by Monsanto and conclude that these products are safe.  Others are sanctioned by independent groups funded by "the people" who are protecting their health interests.  Typically, results from studies not financed by Monsanto show that GMO products can increase the risk of cancer and cause adverse health issues.

GE and GMOs can damage the environment and introduce additional pesticides into the food supply endangering the health of all consumers.  The unfortunate truth is that 80% of the food supply is already contaminated by GMOs.  The effects to our health are unknown.  

Do you really want to be a guinea pig?

What can we do?

Fight this by mandating the labeling of GMO products on food labels:

http://justlabelit.org/

Spread the news on Facebook.  

Read these articles to find out why GMOs and GE seeds are bad for you, your neighbors, and the environment.

http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/2013/04/02/gmos-monsanto-protection-act/
http://www.safe-food.org/-issue/dangers.html
http://www.organicconsumers.org/ge/ge_vs_organic.cfm
http://www.organicauthority.com/foodie-buzz/eight-reasons-gmos-are-bad-for-you.html
http://www.badseed.info/
http://dailybail.com/home/jon-stewart-exposes-the-monsanto-protection-act.html

Main Sources:

http://www.workers.org/2013/04/07/monsanto-protection-act-chemical-monopoly-writes-its-own-law/
http://dailybail.com/home/jon-stewart-exposes-the-monsanto-protection-act.html